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Your Corner of the World

With all of the pressing needs and complex issues in our society, life can seem overwhelming. The power of one seems diminished when looking into the eye of poverty, dementia, cancer, autism, war, and social injustice just to name a few.

I remember when staying at a bed and breakfast, very pregnant with my 4th child, Howard and I found ourselves engaged in a conversation with an older couple. I was sharing my story about Gentry. The woman, obviously in pain, stopped me abruptly to say that, “everyone has a story”. In sharing mine, I was not meaning to minimize hers. Truly each of our lives could be projected onto a big screen to a captive audience. It is up to us to share our stories so that, when the fight of our lives comes, we can wrestle with the pain and squeeze the nectar from the struggle. I believe pain has something to teach. I also believe pain is what connects humanity. Pain reminds us that it is no respecter of persons. How we respond to it drastically changes us, for better or worse.

How does this change occur? What is one single person to do? I find peace when I look at my corner of the world: my family, then my community. There is plenty of work to do right there and this small corner seems manageable, even impactful. I would encourage everyone to look at what life has administered to them…what challenge it has brought. Each of us will have a unique opportunity to grow introduced to us at some point in life. Recognize that your situation is not unique to you: you are not alone. Find your community, join hands, then forces. Together change is possible.

A dear friend sent me a quote by CS Lewis this week that is so simple yet so true:

“We can ignore pleasure. But pain insists being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: it is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.”

I could not agree more. Pain is a megaphone. The question is, will if deafen and defeat you or instruct and guide you? Let pain change (not define) you then use that change and clean up your corner of the world.

COMMUNITY AT HEART OF BEACH CULTURE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Next month’s Beach Culture World Championships is expected to open brand new doors for Silver Sands and communities like it around Barbados. So says organiser, Brian ‘de Action Man’ Talma.

With this year’s championship and Waterman Festival slated for May 31st to June 5th, and expected to attract competition form all across the globe in windsurfing, kitesurfing, stand up paddle and surfing, the Silver Sands area, headed by Talma, is banking heavily on organic tourism in a bid to promote the community, as they seek to make it a more safe and healthy place to live and visit for locals and tourists alike.

Speaking during this past week’s media launch for the championships, Talma explained that it was his aim to create the most prosperous sports and culture-oriented community on the island using organic tourism, a concept he had created and was bearing fruit at home and abroad.

Noting that he hoped to spread to similar communities such as Sandy Beach and Bathsheba, Talma said that the idea was to create a strong beach culture across the island and involve young persons to be a part of economic process that should follow the model.

“Twenty years ago ,I said that beach culture would be the number-one when it comes to image base and sport, and I believe we are going in that direction. The only part I am disappointed about is the local communities in these surf-breaks are not part of the equation,” he said.

Drawing reference to seven-time windsurfing champion, Carlito Spunti, who hails from a small fishing village in Italy, Talma said that the children from local communities could also go all the way, as they were the driving force behind community tourism.

“I want to show the kids from the Silver Sands community and the broader communities like Sandy Beach and Bathsheba that there is prosperity and job opportunities for all people of Barbados,” he said.

Chief Executive Officer of the Barbados Tourism Product Authority, Dr. Kerry Hall, was also present at the launch, and said that initiative was one that resonated with the mandate of her organisation.

“This falls clearly in line with our vision as an organisation, as we seek to create a more sustainable tourism industry. And we know a sustainable tourism industry is one that speaks to the involvement and the engagement of the Barbadian people, and we really admire Brian’s vision, in terms of what he has done here in Silver Sands, how he has involved and engaged the people, and we know that once we do that, the Barbadian people and the community will protect and nurture the tourism industry,” she said.

Going on to stress the importance of reciprocity between the island and its visitors, Dr. Hall said that this model lent to a natural balance of give and take.

“It is not a matter of just holding an event in a community where people come in, they take advantage of the natural assets of that event and then they leave. It is about ensuring that the community is involved, that the community benefits, that our visitors and the members of our community can interact.

“We talk about tourism mostly in economic terms, in terms of foreign exchange and, yes, that is very important. But also, a very important component of tourism is the social aspect of tourism, which promotes friendships, bonding, understanding, learning amongst the citizens of the world, and that’s what happens up here every single day,” she said.̇

Walk! It Is Good for Your Heart

Walking is an intrinsic human function that serves many roles. First of all, it helps clear the mind, pace the thoughts and calm us down. Second, it is a great exercise that helps tone the legs, shed extra weight, improve lung ventilation and overall health. It is also a great way to reduce the risk of heart disease. It temporarily quickens the heart rate, increasing blood circulation through the body and bringing more oxygen to other organs. At the same time, walking increases the lungs’ ability to take in oxygen from the air, lowers blood pressure, improves cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

Walking can help slow down the aging process and it works no matter what age you get started. It is low impact, requires no special equipment or skills and can be done at any time of the day and at your own pace. Moreover, you can walk without worrying about the risks usually associated with some vigorous forms of exercise.

When we walk, we carry our own body weight. It is called weight-bearing exercise and some of its benefits are:

  • Increased heart and lung fitness
  • Reduces risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Improved management of hypertension, diabetes, muscular and joint stiffness
  • Improved blood lipid profile
  • Increased muscle strength
  • Reduced body fat.

To get overall as well as the heart health benefits, it is necessary to walk at least 30 minutes per day as briskly as possible. Briskly means that you can still talk, but can be slightly puffing. It doesn’t even have to be non-stop; three ten-minute walks a day will work as efficiently too. You will help lower blood pressure and strengthen the heart just by walking regularly. Therefore, try to make walking your daily routine by:

  • Taking the stairs and avoiding elevator
  • Getting off public transport one or two stops earlier and walking to the final destination (home or work)
  • Walking, not driving, to the local shops
  • Walking your children to school
  • Parking your car further from your destination.

As it has been mentioned, regular walking triggers anti-aging processes and also helps repair old DNA. In order to stay motivated, walk with friends or co-workers at lunch, walk your or your neighbor’s dog, join a walking club, use a pedometer or your phone app to measure the number of steps made per day and start increasing it gradually. It is recommended to start off with 2, 000 steps and work toward the 5, 000-step goal. Once you’ve met the desired goal, you may just want to maintain your fitness level or set a goal of 10, 000 steps. Remember, even a little walking is good, but more is better.

However, put your safety first. If the weather is harsh and the streets are slippery, you’d better walk in a mall, down long hallways or on the stairs.

 

5 Surprising Causes of Heart Disease

Heart disease is known as a silent killer. Most of the time its strikes unexpectedly or is detected at deadly stages. However, early discovery is the key. Besides the obvious causes of heart disease, there are additional factors you should watch out for. Here are 5 surprising causes of heart disease and how to prevent it.

Loneliness. While this sound like a cliché, there is an actual truth to it. Based on studies, the risk of heart diseases can go up at least 30 percent due to depression and loneliness. Unintended Isolation and loneliness can cause undue stress, high blood pressure and depression. When this happens certain brain chemicals also change, causing more damage to your body. It’s important to have a good social support and to distress. Also, if you feel the onset of depression, its best to immediately seek professional help.

Regular Drinking. Regular alcohol consumption can not only result in addiction and liver illness, but hardening of arteries as well. Cholesterol level can increase as well. A contributing factor in heart disease. It is okay to drink occasionally, and do drink moderately.

Recurrent Flu. If you regularly have the flu, it’s definitely a cause for concern and it is not just the flu itself. Being a viral condition, a person suffering from the flu can have a severely decreased immune system. That’s why a flu often comes with a cough, cold and other illnesses. Unfortunately, a weakened immune system can be prone to heart disease because the virus can get in the heart valves and canals, which in turn will weaken the tissues.

Lack of Vitamin D. Vitamin D is an important nutrient needed by the body. A lack of the said vitamin has been known to cause heart diseases in some people. The good thing is that vitamin D is easily obtainable from foods like oily fish, green leafy veggies, egg yolks, orange juice and soy milk. You can have yourself checked if the vitamin D deficiency is severe. The doctor will likely provide supplements or vitamin D shots.

Diet Pills. Although maintaining a healthy weight is important, how you do it is significant as well. Diet pills, for instance, can cause more harm than good. Some diet pills have chemicals which can weaken heart muscles and block arteries and lead to heart diseases. Go the safer route: exercise and a good diet. It’s the longer way to lose weight, but it’s still the best. If you really want to take diet pills, consult a doctor. At least a medical practitioner can provide you with an informed choice and sound medical advice.

You And Your Healthy Heart

Keeping your heart healthy is everything, and did you know that a full 80% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented? It’s true and with odds like that, wouldn’t you like to know what you can do to decrease your risk? While we all think that we know what to do to maintain a healthy heart, do we actually all do those things? Changing just a few of the things we do each day can have a great benefit to our heart, and keeping that healthy and happy goes a long way to our well being. Who’s in?

If you’ve ever been to an ER with chest pain, you know one of the first questions they ask you is if you smoke. Not only does it smell bad, cost a lot of money and make you sick, smoking is one of the top risk factors for both heart attack and stroke. Not surprisingly then, one of the top things to do to increase your heart health is to ditch the cigarettes!

Other things on that list are proper weight management, limiting calories, exercise, maintaining a healthy blood pressure, reducing stress, monitor your cholesterol levels and of course, know the risks.

Simply, the risk factors for having a stroke, in addition to smoking is high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, age, family history, taking birth control pills, a prior heart attack, heart failure and excessive drinking of alcohol.

Similarly, the risk factors for a heart attack are again, high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels, diabetes, hormone replacement therapy, smoking and not getting enough exercise.

Imagine how much ‘heart’ healthier we would be if we exercised more, watched what we ate, kept a close check on our blood pressure and cholesterol levels and tried to maintain a healthier lifestyle.

Sometimes, even when we try really hard, heart attacks and strokes happen. If you experience sudden weakness or numbness in face or limbs, if you have a sudden severe headache, difficulty talking or understanding speech, sudden dimness in one eye or unexplained dizziness you may be having a stroke.

If you have chest discomfort, pressure, pain, squeezing or a discomfort in your arms, back, neck, jaw, stomach, shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness or you break out into a cold sweat you may be having a heart attack. In both instances seek medical attention right away, it just may save your life!

What You Need to Know About Heart Diseases and Stroke

Introduction.

Heart disease is a name given to a variety of conditions that affect the performance of the heart. There are certain disturbances in the action of the heart without any disease in the organ. Most common of these is palpitation. This may be due to emotional states, such as fear, anger, joy, grief, or anxiety; or to certain drugs or poisons such as may be found in tea, coffee, tobacco, or alcoholic drinks.

As heart failure approaches, the real symptoms of the heart disease appear. Shortness of breath on slight exertion is one of the first symptoms. Distress and fullness after eating are very common. Other early symptoms are weakness and lack of endurance, in the legs particularly; palpitation of the heart with fullness in the chest and a dry cough; dull pain and soreness in the region of the liver and also over the heart. Swelling of the ankles may be one of the first symptoms noticed. It is usually worse in the evening and disappears during sleep. Weakness increases until the patient finds himself utterly exhausted on the slightest exertion. He is restless and sleepless.

Every person with acute heart disease of any variety should be under the daily care of a physician and everyone with chronic heart disease should be seen frequently by a physician. A common misconception about the heart is that once it is affected, there is the permanent difficulty, with chronic invalidism and early death. Nothing is further from the truth. The rugged heart often makes an excellent recovery in the course of time. Rest, both physical and mental, is a valuable remedy. The patient must choose food that will not cause gas and indigestion, and guard against emotional outbursts, especially anger.

1. Types of Heart Diseases.

Important examples of heart disease include:

i. Angina, in which there is poor blood circulation to the heart.

ii. Heart Attack, in which there is the death of part of the heart muscle.

iii. Arrhythmia, in which the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat is abnormal.

iv. Atherosclerosis, in which the arteries harden. It is a build-up of cholesterol and other fat substances within the walls of the arteries. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease and can develop in any artery in the body. It is a common disorder of the arteries.

v. Rheumatic, this was formerly one of the most serious forms of heart disease of childhood and adolescence. This disease involves damage to the entire heart and its membranes. It is a complication of rheumatic fever and usually occurs after attacks of rheumatic fever. The incidence of this condition has been greatly reduced by widespread use of antibiotics effective against the streptococcal bacterium that causes rheumatic fever.

vi. Myocarditis, it’s the inflammation or degeneration of the heart muscle. This can be due to a complication during or after various viral, bacterial or parasitic infectious diseases, such as polio, influenza, rubella, or rheumatic fever. This can be caused by several diseases such as syphilis, goitre, endocarditis, or hypertension. It may be associated with dilation (enlargement due to the weakness of the heart muscle) or with hypertrophy (overgrowth of the muscle tissue).

2. Know the signs of a heart attack.

During a heart attack, men often have these symptoms:

i. Pain or discomfort in the Centre of the chest.

ii. Pain or discomfort in other areas of the upper body, including the arms, back, neck, jaw, or stomach.

iii. Other symptoms, such as shortness of breath breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea, or light-headedness.

3. The basics of stroke.

Stroke is the third leading cause of death for men. The stroke occurs when part of the brain does not get the blood it needs. Then, brain cells die.

There are two types of stroke.

i. An ischemic (iss-kee-mik) stroke. This happens when blood is blocked from getting to the brain.

ii. A hemorrhagic (heh-muh-ra-jik) stroke. This happens when a blood vessel in the brain bursts and blood bleeds into the brain.

A person might also have a “mini-stroke.” This happens when, for a short time, less blood than normal gets to the brain. You may have some signs of a full stroke, or you may not notice any signs at all. But it only lasts a few minutes up to 24 hours. Then you’re back to normal. Many people don’t even know they’ve had it. However, a “mini-stroke” is a sign of a full stroke to come, so it’s important to know the signs of a stroke.

4. Know the signs of Stroke.

The signs of a stroke happen suddenly and are different from the signs of a heart attack. Look for these signs:

i. Weakness or numbness on one side of your body.
ii. Dizziness
iii. loss of balance
iv. Confusion
v. Trouble talking or understanding speech
vi. A headache
vii. Nausea
viii. Trouble walking or seeing.

Remember: Even if you have a “mini-stroke” you may have some of these signs.

5. 12 Steps to a healthy heart;

i. Do not smoke: It is no surprise that smoking hurts your heart. So if you smoke, try to quit.

ii. Get your cholesterol tested: If it is high (above 200), talk to your doctor or nurse about losing weight (if you are overweight) and getting more active. Ask if there is the medicine that may help.

iii. Know your blood pressure: Your heart moves blood through your body. If it is hard for your heart to do this, your heart works harder and your blood pressure will rise. Have it checked to make sure you’re on track! It is high (systolic above 139 and diastolic above 89), talk to your doctor or nurse about how to lower it.

iv. Get tested for diabetes: Diabetes can raise your chances of getting heart disease. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar levels in check! This is the best way for you to take care of yourself and your heart.

v. Eat heart-healthy foods: Whole grain foods, vegetables, and fruits. Choose lean meats and low-fat cheese and dairy products. Limit foods that have lots of saturated fat, like butter, whole milk, baked goods, ice cream, fatty meats and cheese.

vi. Keep a healthy weight: Being overweight or obese raises your risk for heart disease.

vii. Eat less salt: Choose foods salt. Use spices, herbs, lemon, and lime instead of salt. This is really important if you have high blood pressure.

viii. Do not drink too much of alcohol: Too much alcohol raises blood pressure and can raise your risk of stroke and other problems.

ix. Get moving: Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days, if not all days of the week.

x. Take your medicine: If your doctor has prescribed medicine to lower your blood pressure or cholesterol, take it exactly as you have been told to take it.

xi. Take steps to treat your sleep problems: If you snore loudly, have been told you stop breathing at times when you sleep and are very sleepy during the day, you may have sleep apnea. If you don’t treat it, it raises your chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Talk with your doctor or nurse about treating this problem.

Prevention of Heart Disease and Stroke

Introduction.

Conventional and unorthodox doctors unanimously agree that foods such as seafood, fruits, vegetables, green tea, nuts, grains, legumes, onions, ginger, hot pepper, garlic, olive oil, alcohol in moderation, foods high in Vitamin C, E and beta-carotene preserve the arteries and prevent heart disease and stroke. Meats and dairy foods high in saturated fat, excessive alcohol and smoking, on the other hand, could damage arteries and the heart.

Indeed, simply eating meals that include all ingredients known to individually prevent heart disease could add years to life. According to an international group of experts’ calculations, if men aged 50 and older added almonds, garlic and other heart disease-fighting ingredients to their daily diets, they might increase their life expectancy by more than six years, and spend more time free of heart disease.

Among women, following the same recipe after age 50 could add almost five extra years of life, the authors’ report in the British Medical Journal.

They call their recommendation diet the ‘Poly-meal,’ playing off the ‘Polypill’ idea, which received substantial attention, on the idea of giving everyone a combination pill to prevent heart disease. The ‘Poly-meal’ contains those ingredients that research has consistently shown can decrease the risk of heart disease.

The menu includes wine, fish, dark chocolate, fruits, vegetables, garlic and almonds. All ingredients must be consumed daily in the recommended amounts, except for fish, which research suggests should be eaten four times per week.

Also, eating beans, including soya beans, kidney bean and chickpeas, has been shown to actually help lower cholesterol levels and improve heart health.

1. What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a type of fat (lipid) in one’s blood. More so, one’s cell, as well as one’s body, makes all it needs. Cholesterol also can get from the food we eat.

If there are too much of cholesterol in the body. It starts to build up in one’s arteries (Arteries are the blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart). This is called atherosclerosis or arteries hardening. This is where some heart and blood flow problems started.

The arteries can be narrowed through this buildup and make it harder for blood to flow through them. The buildup can also lead to dangerous blood clots and inflammation that can cause heart attacks and strokes.

Many things can affect cholesterol levels, including:

i. The food one does eat. Eating too much-saturated fat, Trans fat and cholesterol can raise one’s cholesterol.

ii. Being overweight. This may lower HDL (“Good”) cholesterol.

iii. Being inactive. Not exercising may lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol.

iv. Age. Cholesterol starts to rise after age 20.

v. Family history. If family members have or had high cholesterol, you may also have it.

There are different types of cholesterol:

i. Low-Density Lipo-Protein Cholesterol. is the “bad” cholesterol. It’s the type that can raise the risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

ii. High-Density Lipo-Protein Cholesterol is the “good” cholesterol. It’s the type that is linked to a lower risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

2. High-Density Lipo-Protein Cholesterol and Low-Density Lipo-Protein Cholesterol.

The University of Western Ontario in London, Researchers found that flavonoids and limonoids present in orange juice increases the body’s HDL cholesterol (so-called ‘good’ cholesterol) level, which helps wash out the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (‘the bad’ cholesterol) from the system. Other citrus juices, such as grapefruit, also contain this bio-chemical. Orange juice is also a good source of Vitamin C.

Researchers also suggest that drinking three glasses of orange juice a day increases the ‘good’ High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and lowers the chance of getting heart disease.

In this study, patients with high cholesterol began by drinking one glass of orange juice daily for four weeks, eventually consuming three glasses daily for four weeks. The patients that did not drink any juice for five weeks and had their cholesterol tested again.

The results showed that while LDL cholesterol did not go down, the average HDL cholesterol level rose by 21 percent and the ratio of HDL to total cholesterol decreased by 16 percent. The combination of raising HDL cholesterol and lowering the ratio is known to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre say beans increase blood levels of phytoestrogens or plant estrogens in women. According to Dr Bairey Merz. “A very significant relationship between increased phytoestrogen levels and lower cholesterol, this is the results of this study.”

There also may be “positive associations” with phytoestrogens and hormone replacement therapy for women during and after menopause.

3. Changes in diet and lifestyle have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of heart disease.

The next challenge is whether the same benefits can be obtained by taking supplement capsules instead of eating beans themselves. Other studies show that artificial forms produce less positive results. This probably means people should be eating beans as opposed taking supplements in capsule form.

Even modest changes in diet and lifestyle have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of heart disease.

In general, eating foods low in cholesterol, saturated fat and salt and taking vitamins and supplements or eating foods containing the essential vitamins and minerals is recommended.

Nutritionists also recommend eating oily fishes for better heart health. Fatty acids in fish contain Omega 3 that was shown to be effective in preventing heart diseases. Fish oil has been discovered some years ago by scientists to contain a kind of polyunsaturated oil that may be especially protective against heart attacks.

Indeed, scientists studying the health of different world population noticed an especially low incidence of coronary heart disease among the Eskimos of Greenland and Japanese people living in fishing villages on the sea. Though widely separated geographically, these two populations had at least one thing in common. Both groups consume the tremendous amount of fatty fish, fish oil, whale blubber and other marine life that fed on fish.

The scientists report that at first, their healthy hearts seemed incongruous since very high levels of fat in the diet-regardless of the source of that fat are considered a risk factor for heart disease.

Further studies revealed that both the maritime Japanese and Eskimos had the low level of triglycerides (a kind of blood fat), high levels of HDL cholesterol and reduced tendency for their blood to clot. All these things are classic signs suggesting a sound, healthy cardiovascular system.

Digging deeper the researchers found that the fish-loving people also had high levels of a class of fatty acid called Omega-3 fatty acids also known as Docosa Hexaenoic Acid (DHA), which comes from fish.

Cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, and herring are reportedly the richest sources of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, but most other fish and seafood contain some as well. Dutch researchers found that those who eat fish regularly have a lower rate of heart disease and stroke than those who do not.

4. Garlic, Ginger prevents the oxidation of LDL cholesterol and heart attack.

Many studies indicate that garlic prevents the oxidation of LDL cholesterol, may prevent the liver from producing excess fat and cholesterol.

Based on one study, by adding to a fatty as little as two ounces of garlic juice, the cholesterol-laden meal was found to actually lower the cholesterol by up to seven percent. Another study found that a day 600-mg of garlic powder could push the total cholesterol down by some 10 percent. According to other research that corroborated these findings reporting that LDL cholesterol while raising the HDL (“good”) cholesterol can be lowered by garlic

Eating three cloves of garlic a day keeps the cholesterol down for extended periods. It is reported that because garlic contains ajoene and other substances, it also helps to keep the blood “thin” and free of potentially deadly blood clots.

Ayurvedic physicians suggest that eating a little bit of ginger every day will help to prevent the heart attack. It reduces cholesterol. It prevents blood clots and reduces blood pressure. Therefore for a healthy heart, ginger is an important herb

Ginger’s heart-helping attributes are reportedly similar to that of garlic. Ginger has been shown to interfere with the long sequence of events necessary for blood clots to form. This reportedly helps to prevent clots that can lodge in narrowed coronary arteries and set off a heart attack.

5. An increase in intake in the number of servings of fruits and vegetables per day decrease in stroke risk and heart attack.

Onions have been shown to contain adenosine and other ‘blood thinners’ that help to prevent the formation of blood clots. To thin the blood, onions reportedly help keep the coronary arteries open and clear by increasing the HDL. Eating half a raw onion every day has been shown to increase HDL by 20 to 30 percent.

In a study of 87,000 nurses conducted by Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard University, compared with those who ate one serving a month or less, subjects who ate five or more servings of carrots every week had a 68-percent lower risk of suffering stroke. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene and other carotenoids, all members of the vitamin A family. Eating a lot of fruits and veggies that are rich in beta-carotene and vitamin C and E, can reduce the risk of having the stroke by as much as 54 percent if they enjoy carrots often.

Cayenne pepper improves circulation and heart function without raising blood pressure according to recent studies. It also enhances the power of other herbs taken at the same time.

The bromelain the enzyme that present in Pineapple is best known for its ability to break down proteins. It is a key ingredient in meat tenderizers. The bromelain action of anti-clotting might help prevent ischemic stroke and heart attack.

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that fruits and vegetables are beneficial in combating stroke. It was conducted at Harvard’s School of Public Health where investigators studied the relationship between fruit intake and the rate of stroke in over 75,000 women.

There is a decrease in stroke risk in those who had an increase in intake in the number of servings of fruits and vegetables per day.

More so, the same Journal of the America Medical Association revealed that eating whole grain bread can drop stroke risk by 43 percent. Dr Simin Liu of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. The USA conducted a study that followed the health and stroke frequency of nurses over a multi-year period. The dietary concern has been paid attention to and intake of whole grain bread. Liu said, “replacing refined grains with whole grains by even one serving a day may have significant benefits in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke’. The study concludes, “With a lower risk of ischemic stroke among women higher intake of whole grain foods was associated with this.”

Conclusion.

Nearly all legumes contain genistein, a cancer-preventive nutrient. I addition to guarding against cancer, genistein is also reported to have a significant anti-clotting effect. So, it is believed that it may also help prevent ischemic stroke and heart attack. Genistein according to reports can also be obtained from tofu and soy products. English peas or other beans and legumes.

Green tea has been shown to help keep blood pressure under control. It also may help keep cholesterol from clogging arteries. The herb tea reportedly contains Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) and other substances that help in the body protection against the dangers of oxidation, while helping to keep the harmful LDL cholesterol down and the helpful HDL cholesterol up. According to reports, they also assist in keeping blood pressure under control.

Your Child’s Healthy Heart

As your child grows, he or she is developing the habits that will last a lifetime. What you do now to promote healthy nutrition and physical activity will affect your child’s health forever. It’s important for you to examine your lifestyle right now and find ways that you can help your heart to stay healthy.

It’s crucial that you lead by example. Children learn much more by what they see you do than by what you tell them. So it doesn’t do any good for you to tell your child about the dangers of smoking while you have a cigarette hanging out of your mouth.

Start by looking at what kind of example you’re setting for your child. Do you need to stop smoking? Do you need to eat more fruits and vegetables? Look around your home to see if you’re providing a positive, healthy environment that will set your child up for a healthy heart.

For example, your child should never be exposed to second-hand smoke. You should also provide a large variety of whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and lean protein for your child’s diet. In addition, physical activity should be a part of every day life.

Encourage your child to turn off the television or video games and play outside. Riding a bike, skateboarding, and simply throwing a ball with friends is a great way to get physical activity. You don’t have to tell your child to “exercise”. If you encourage him to play, he’ll automatically get what he needs.

You can also help your child by having family time that’s devoted to physical activity and good nutrition. You don’t have to make a lesson out of it; you simply have to do it. For example, your family may want to plant a vegetable garden in the backyard.

You’ll use physical activity to tend the garden and you’ll have fresh produce that’s heart healthy. You may also want to take a stroll around the neighborhood as a family. As often as you can, walk to run your errands instead of driving.

Childhood is the perfect time to set up healthy habits for your child. If your child enjoys eating a variety of foods and gets a lot of physical activity, she’ll be more likely to continue those practices as an adult.

When you’re at work, you tend to be focused on the task at hand. That can put your health on the back burner. But if you’re serious about keeping your heart healthy, you can use work time to an advantage. There are plenty of simple things you can do to make work a healthy place.

Whenever possible, you should take the stairs instead of the elevator. This allows your body to get some extra physical activity built in. Now, if you work on the 25th floor, you may not want to walk up all those stairs.

Instead, you can try taking the elevator to the 23rd floor and walking up two floors. Once that becomes easier, you can add a floor at a time. Eventually you may find that you can challenge yourself to walking the whole thing – you just can’t be in a hurry.

Many workplaces offer gym facilities for employees. You can use your lunch break or come to work early to exercise. You can also hit the gym at the end of the day before you go home. If you’re job doesn’t offer this amenity, but you’d still like to work out at a gym find one that’s between your home and work so that it’s convenient to stop on your way home.

Brown bagging it can also save your heart and your money. Bringing your lunch every day is likely to be healthier than eating out. It’s also far less expensive than eating out. You may even want to keep some standard snacks in your desk or the work refrigerator so you don’t have to pack something every day. Packing your lunch the night before will help you to get out the door quickly in the morning.

Enlisting your coworkers in an exercise group can also be a great way to add physical activity to your day. Get together a group of people who want to walk on their lunch break or after work. You can help motivate one another on tough days.

Taking public transportation, where possible, is another great way to stay heart healthy. You’ll get more activity walking to and from the bus or train stop than you would by taking your car. You’ll also be doing something good for the environment.

Finally, when you’re at work stay away from tobacco use. If you don’t smoke, you want to stay away from second-hand smoke. And if you’re trying to quit smoking, you may find that smoking is difficult to stop when you’re around coworkers who smoke. You might want to find somewhere else to go during breaks where you won’t be tempted to try it.

In very serious cases of blockage, heart bypass surgery may need to be performed. This creates a bypass around the blockage in the heart and can prevent heart attacks from occurring.

Atherosclerosis Explained

Throughout your lifetime fat and cholesterol mix together with other material and begin to line the walls of your blood vessels. This mixture is called plaque. As time passes, the plaque becomes hard and gets thicker. This causes your blood vessels to become more narrow and can even completely block them if it goes untreated.

As you can imagine, it’s difficult for blood to pass through these narrow vessels. As a result, stress is put on the heart. This leads to heart disease and can eventually cause a heart attack if there’s blockage in the actual coronary blood vessels themselves.

In addition, pieces of the hardened plaque can actually separate from the walls and break away. When this happens the small piece flows through the blood vessels and can actually cause a heart attack or even a stroke.

In addition, blood clots can form around the rogue piece of plaque and block blood flow even further. The clots can also travel to the brain, heart, or lungs. The tragic result of this may be as serious as a stroke, heart attack, or pulmonary embolism.

Unfortunately, there are rarely symptoms of atherosclerosis until you have a serious issue such as chest pain or even a heart attack. Early stages of it can sometimes be heard through a stethoscope, but usually more extensive testing is required to diagnose hardening of the arteries.

The good news is that if you catch it early, there’s plenty you can do to keep it from getting worse. Your doctor may prescribe a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet in order to reduce the amount of cholesterol and fat in your blood. You may also need to increase your physical activity and work to lose some weight.

In more serious cases, medication may be required to help lower cholesterol and even thin the blood to prevent clots. Surgical intervention through angioplasty is also a treatment option. A procedure called endarterectomy can be performed to actually remove some of the plaque from the vessel walls, though this isn’t as common.

In very serious cases of blockage, heart bypass surgery may need to be performed. This creates a bypass around the blockage in the heart and can prevent heart attacks from occurring.

Automatic Defibrillators at Home and at Work

One of the most important advances in emergency response is the development of the automatic defibrillator. This is a device that helps to electronically stimulate the heart to beat if someone is having a heart attack.

In the past, first responders had to rely on CPR to keep the blood pumping through the body until help arrived, but now a trained person can actually begin a procedure to start the heart.

Automatic external defibrillators (AED) are very user friendly. They come with two self-stick pads that are attacked the chest in specific areas. Then you press a button on the machine to begin the process.

The machine analyzes the heartbeat and tells the responder what to do. For example, if there’s no shockable heart rhythm, the machine will tell you to continue to administer CPR.

The machine will also intermittently check the heart rate by telling you to stop CPR and wait. If it finds a shockable rhythm, it will tell you to clear everyone away from the person and press the button to administer the electricity. It will then measure the heartbeat and give you instructions for what to do next.

Defibrillators can be found in many workplaces and on airplanes. They allow someone to get quick medical treatment while waiting for an ambulance to arrive. AEDs have been shown to increase chances of survival from a heart attack by 50-74%. It’s also possible to purchase one for your home, though they cost over a thousand dollars at this time.

One thing that’s critical is that you receive the proper training to use the AED. Along with using the AED, you may need to perform CPR. If CPR is performed incorrectly, it can lead to injury.

You can receive training in both AED and CPR at your local American Heart Association or American Red Cross. This training is relatively inexpensive and is lifesaving. You may also want to talk to someone in your workplace about investing in an AED for the office as well as training the entire staff to use it.

Before the AED came into existence, people could only perform CPR. CPR isn’t designed to restart the heart; it only helps to keep oxygen moving throughout the tissues of the body until medical help arrives.

What Is Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea?

Firstly, yes, this is a tongue-twister, I had to have a few goes before I pronounced it properly, not to mention that it sounds like a scary zombie disease! So, what does it actually mean? To break it down quite simply- Paroxymal is means a sudden outburst or attack; nocturnal means night and dyspnea is shortness of breath. Together, Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea (PND) is the sense of oxygen deficiency during sleep, the oxygen deprivation causes a person to cough and wheeze, which significantly increases diastolic pressure.

So it isn’t a zombie disease, but most would say it is scary. PND is a common symptom of congestive heart failure. A person suffering from a PND will need urgent medical attention- calling an ambulance is the first immediate step, however other treatments to appease the episode could include taking nitroglycerin and diuretics.

PND has very similar symptoms to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA), however is not an independent separate disease. PND is very different, it is a severe clinical syndrome directly related to acute heart failure.

People suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome have a significant decrease in the muscle tone of their respiratory tract during sleep, which leads to obstruction of airways. This causes episodes of apnea where breathing completely stops.

During such pauses, the oxygen content of the blood drops, and signals are received in the respiratory center that the tissues are in a state of hypoxia. After 10-20 seconds, the oxygen level in the blood drops to the minimum, and this finally causes the body to react to the situation. A microstimulation of the brain increases the muscle tone of the upper respiratory tract that helps to inhale. For several seconds after that, the breathing of the sleeper remains frequent and deep. At this time, the person also experiences shortness of breath, although they may not wake up.

Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea Causes?

Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea is common among elderly people with heart problems, however it can still happen to anyone who suffers from:

  • left ventricular failure in a period of exacerbation;
  • acute myocardial infarction;
  • acute myocarditis;
  • aneurysms of the heart;
  • postpartum cardiomyopathy;
  • cardiosclerosis;
  • mitral stenosis;
  • aortic insufficiency;
  • the presence of a large intracardiac thrombus or tumor.

The exacerbation factors that can cause the PND episode in a person with the medical issues listed above are:

  • pneumonia;
  • kidney damage;
  • disorders of cerebral circulation;
  • emotional overwork;
  • big dinner for the night;
  • hypervolemia;
  • Rapid changing from vertical to horizontal body position.

What are the Symptoms of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea?The most common symptoms of PND are the following:

  • intermittent sleep;
  • dyspnea with physical exercises;
  • dyspnea at night in a lying position, but relieving in a sitting position;
  • a cough with wheezing;
  • production of sputum, sometimes with blood;
  • whistling in the lungs;
  • a constant sense of lack of air;
  • pain in the chest;
  • arrhythmia;
  • feet swelling;
  • fatigue and drowsiness.

Typically an episode occurs as follows: a person wakes up from a nightmarish dream, feeling tight in the chest and a desire to sit down, their breathing is deep and hard. Narrowing of the bronchioles creates shortness of breath, which makes it hard for the person to speak. When sitting, the person usually leans forward slightly. Their skin becomes pale because of the spasm of surface vessels, and sometimes they break into a sweat. PND can start suddenly and can stop just as suddenly in half an hour. The person may still suffer from dyspnea in the morning when they wake.Why does Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea cause these Symptoms?

During sleep in a person with heart problems, body fluid begins to redistribute from tissues into the blood, which during the day accumulated in the legs or abdominal cavity. This process does not happen rapidly so after falling asleep there would be no immediate symptoms. Paroxysmal dyspnea develops slowly after a considerable time after falling asleep.

In people with heart failure, the left side of the heart does not work at full strength, so the small circle of blood circulation cannot cope with the additional volume of fluid. This volume stays in the excess vessels of the lungs. This additional volume then moves from the vessels into the lung tissue, which leads to the development of interstitial pulmonary edema.

The severest form of paroxysmal dyspnea is acute pulmonary edema, which develops as a result of increased pressure in the pulmonary capillaries and leads to alveolar edema. The typical symptoms of pulmonary edema are the acute shortage of air, wet wheezing, and bloody sputum. Acute pulmonary edema can quickly lead to death.

How to Treat Paroxysmal Nocturnal Dyspnea?

Before treatment, it is crucial to perform a thorough medical assessment to determine the cause of the paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. An appropriate examination, exploration of medical history, chest X-ray, ECG, ultrasound of the heart and Doppler of the heart is crucial for an accurate diagnosis.

During the acute paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea episode, it is vital to call an ambulance due to the high risk of developing pulmonary edema. First aid for the person includes remaining calm, placing them in a semi-sitting position, and putting their feet in a hot bath. Give the person nitroglycerin under the tongue and repeat the drug every 5-10 minutes. If the attack is accompanied by pain and dyspnea, analgesics could also be used. Further therapy can be carried out according to the cause of the disease.

The general recommendation for preventing paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea are stopping smoking, weight reduction in obese persons and normalizing blood pressure levels. A strict diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables and avoiding heavily salted food is also recommended. Oxygen therapy is an effective means of controlling the disease, for use not only in the hospital but also at home.

Prevention of the disease consists in the timely treatment of chronic coronary artery disease and heart failure, arterial hypertension, observance of the water-salt regime, prevention of infectious diseases.

A thorough medical assessment must to be undertaken to ensure the correct syndrome is diagnosed, so if you think you have obstructive sleep apnea symptoms, it could be PND, so get it properly checked out by a doctor.

Mandita has been a sufferer of OSA syndrome for many years, which caused her excessive loud snoring. As this is a sleeping disorder that is not widely spoken about, she found it hard to locate information to help her understand the causes and symptoms of the syndrome, and also the treatments available.

Tips To Reduce Your Risk Of Heart Disease And Stroke

Heart disease can be a serious affair if you don’t take immediate action. Nowadays, the condition is very common among men and women both. And the main cause of it is the poor lifestyle that pushes us toward the dangerous disease. Preventing the condition before it’s too late is compulsory and if you are looking for a few ways that help you deal with it, so, here are some tips. Take a look to know about them.

Take Your Health Seriously: A heart attack is undoubtedly one of the common reasons that lead to death at any age. In an order to prevent it, you first have to take the responsibility for your health. Incorporate any exercise or workout in your routine that helps your heart stay healthy for a longer period.

Quit Smoking: Smoking is injurious to health, even the pack says so. It’s time to take the warning seriously, as it may otherwise only increase problems for you. To keep your heart healthy and away from all the disease, quit it right away. Also, try your level best to keep yourself away from the second-hand smoke.

Count Your Calories: Calories not only increase your weight, but also leads to a number of heart diseases and stroke is one of them. To prevent it or to stay healthy, you should limit the intake of calories. Binge on fruits and vegetables that help you control it and prevent major health disease.

Lower Your Blood Pressure: Though it doesn’t cause any symptom, but can be very dangerous for your heart health. Therefore, it is important for you to take as much as necessary preventive measures to lower down your high blood pressure.

Control Your Cholesterol Level: Cholesterol is also an enemy of the heart that can increase your chances of getting the stroke. Hence, it would be great if you modify your diet and eliminate all the food items from it that increase high cholesterol in your body.

Shed Down Excess Weight: Obesity can also kill you and increase your chances of getting a heart disease or stroke than a normal person. So, if you are overweight, as per your body mass index (BMI), go and take some steps to drop inches.

These are a few tips that you always need to keep in your mind to prevent heart disease or stroke. In case you are suffering from the condition, find out the best heart hospital near you and take the treatment shortly.

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5 Habits That Affect Your Heart

The heart is the main organ in the cardiovascular system, whose function is to pump blood throughout the body, transferring nutrients, oxygen, hormones, and other substances to the appropriate tissues and organs.

When the heart and blood vessels do not work as they should, it gives rise to disorders known as cardiovascular diseases that can be dangerous to your life.

A person who has heart problems is prone to various risk factors – from arterial wear to a heart attack. However, scientists say that the way of life also affects the work of the heart. Therefore, you should know about these 5 habits that can cause heart problems.

Sedentary Lifestyle
If you sit at the computer or in front of the TV for hours, the risk of a stroke increases, even if you regularly exercise. The exercises you do a couple times a week do not compensate for the time you spend in a motionless state.

A sedentary lifestyle has a bad effect on the level of fats and sugar in the blood. Therefore, even if you have to sit for a long time, try to get up and walk from time to time.

Ignoring Snoring
Snoring is often the subject of jokes but in fact, it can be a serious signal. For example, obstructive sleep apnea (a short-term respiratory arrest while sleeping, which can cause an increase in blood pressure) significantly increases the risk of a heart disease.

It is estimated that more than 18 million adults suffer from sleep apnea. This is especially true for people who are overweight or obese. If you snore and often wake up in a broken state, it’s best to consult a doctor. There are easy ways to detect apnea, as well as successful treatment methods.

Smoking or Cohabitation with a Smoker
Here is another advice to you – do not smoke. Smoking is a total disaster for your heart. It promotes the formation of blood clots that can block the flow of blood to the heart and leads to the accumulation of plaques in the arteries.

If you smoke, not only do you put yourself at risk but you also endanger those who live near. Each year, about 46,000 non-smoking people who live with smokers die from heart diseases due to passive smoking.

Overeating
The main cause of heart diseases is being overweight. To avoid overeating problems, try to do the following:
• Don’t eat large portions of food
• Replace sweet drinks with water
• Reduce the consumption of high-calorie dishes
• Keep in mind that products with the “low in fat” inscription often contain a lot of calories

Suppression of Stress, Aggression or Irritation
If you are experiencing negative emotions for a long time but you cannot express them, it puts a heavy burden on your heart.

Those who suppress stress for a long time, endanger themselves. Studies prove that the ability to laugh heartily and maintain friendly relations, as well as enjoy social and family support, have a positive impact on your heart health. Sharing your problems with people who support you is very beneficial for a healthy living.

To learn more about risk factors of heart disease, please visit CardioGod – an informative website that provides useful information on cardiovascular health.

 

The 4-Step Heart-Saver Plan

You’ll be walking to a new beat! Heart disease is one of the biggest killers. Every year thousands of men – and women – die of heart disease while still in their 30s, 40s and 50s.

If you want to reduce YOUR risk of heart disease – or your partner’s chances of dying early of heart disease, here’s how it can be done in four easy steps:

1. CUT DOWN ON ANIMAL FATS

Four out of five people still eat far too much fatty food. If it’s going to do its job properly your heart needs a good regular supply of oxygenated blood. But every mouthful of fat you eat clogs up your arteries just a little bit more. But however how much fat you’ve eaten in the past, it’s not too late to act – if you act NOW. Cutting down your consumption of fat will help keep your arteries open. If you keep on eating fatty foods, the fat will stick to the inside walls of your arteries.

Here’s what you must do:

Eat less red meat – and when you do buy meat, make sure that you buy lean meat. Then cut off any visible fat.

Drink skimmed or semi-skimmed milk.

Eat low-fat spreads instead of butter. Butter has probably killed thousands.

Limit yourself to 2 or 3 eggs a week.

2. START EXERCISING

How much regular exercise do you take? One in three people takes no regular exercise. And most of the rest either exercise sporadically or exercise too much.

Remember: the key words are REGULAR and MODERATE. If you’re going to protect your heart you need to exercise three times a week for an hour or so.

Join a gym. Go to a swimming pool. Buy a bike. Go dancing.

3. LOSE EXCESS WEIGHT

Fat isn’t just ugly. It’s also deadly. This isn’t the time to mess around with gentle words like ‘plump’ or ‘chubby’. FAT kills. You don’t need scales or weight tables to find out if you’re fat. When you get undressed tonight, take a long, hard look at yourself in the mirror. You’ll know if you’re fat. If you are, make up your mind to do something about it.

To lose weight you need to eat less. And you must make sure that in future you only ever eat when you’re hungry.

4. KEEP AWAY FROM CIGARETTES

Cigarette smoke narrows your blood vessels and dramatically increases your chances of having a heart attack. The risk is highest if you’re a smoker. But you could be at risk even if you’re a non-smoker or if the people you live or work with smoke heavily. Smoking causes at least a quarter of all cases of heart disease. So give up smoking. Or cut down if you can’t give up. And if you’re a non-smoker, keep away from smoky rooms and avoid people who smoke.

Remember: you’re a thousand times more likely to be killed by someone else’s cigarette than by someone else’s gun.

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Healthy Changes for Heart Month

From My Heart to Yours: Heart disease remains the number one killer in the U.S. Please consider renewing your commitment to heart healthy habits for heart month and beyond.

Knowing that heart disease affects so many people in the U.S., I’m sure many of you can relate to my story. My dad had heart disease from the time I was 3 years old and died as a result just 10 years later. A cherished uncle followed, and then another uncle (my dad’s brothers). My mom had a heart attack at 80 years of age, which was the beginning of her health decline. Then recently, I was challenged with a heart arrhythmia myself. I was fortunate to have great care at the Cleveland Clinic where an ablation procedure cured my symptoms – but I am still careful to follow lifestyle habits to avoid future issues.

I’m also hitting a milestone birthday this month, and my health is at the center of my thoughts. Granted I can’t do anything about genetics or age as risk factors, but there is a lot I can do! Just because I’m a registered dietitian nutritionist, doesn’t mean that I’m immune to health issues – or bad habits for that matter! The last few years have been challenging between caring for our elderly parents and recovering from my own heart issue. But now that things have calmed down a bit, I’m committed to making more heart-healthy changes. For me, it isn’t all about losing weight; it’s about being healthy and having more energy to do the things I want to do. I was already doing most of the steps outlined below, and now I’ve added more of them into my regular routine. Steps are in no particular order. Don’t worry about making all the changes at once – just choose one step that you believe you can stick with, and go from there.

A few essentials: If you smoke, stop! Find a good program for smoking cessation. Know your numbers: Manage your weight, cholesterol, LDL, as well as hypertension and blood glucose if you have diabetes. Find a way to stay active. Follow a plant based diet, and follow doctor’s orders for prescribed medications. Some of the steps below can help you get started.

Step 1: Increase your physical activity! Exercising lowers blood pressure, strengthens your heart, helps maintain lean body mass, burns calories, and makes you feel good! Walking is one of the easiest exercises to fit into your day. Experts encourage a minimum of 10,000 steps a day (equivalent to 5 miles) – and yes, it’s possible to fit this into a busy schedule. If you are just getting started, walk at least 10 minutes at a time. Work your way up gradually to a minimum of 60 minutes on most days to meet the recommendations from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA).

Before you make changes to your routine, check with your doctor. Once you get the OK, use a fitness tracker or pedometer to count the current number of steps you take per day to use as your starting point. I’ve been wearing a pedometer or Fitbit for more than 10 years to help me stay on target. I love the feature on my Fitbit that reminds me to do a minimum of 250 steps every hour! I no longer sit at my computer working for hours on end without moving.

Step 2: Cut back on high calorie beverages. Do you drink sugar sweetened beverages every day? Just 8 ounces of most sugary beverages packs a whopping 100 calories, and most people don’t stop at 8 ounces. An extra 100 calories a day adds up to 3500 extra calories in just 5 weeks – which could mean an extra pound of weight – or 10 extra pounds in a year!

What about alcohol? Has that “healthy” 100 calorie daily glass of wine turned into 2 or more glasses a day? Alcohol calories go down quickly, and they can also loosen your resolve to control your food intake.

Eliminate sugary beverages and alcohol for at least 30 days to break the habit. Replace them with unsweetened beverages such as water, sparkling water, diffused water (lemons, limes, cucumbers or fruit), hot or iced tea.

Step 3: Cut the saturated fat. Animal fats found in meats, poultry, full fat dairy products (milk, cheese, sour cream, yogurt, etc.), salad dressings, and fried foods are full of saturated fat, which has been linked to heart disease. Reduce portions, cut visible fat from meat, remove skin from poultry, prepare foods using low fat cooking methods (baking, broiling, roasting), and read labels to identify foods with polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fat for better health. Skim or 1% milk, low fat cheese and sour cream, low fat yogurt, and other low fat dairy options are available – and many of them taste good!

Ready to use spray cans of healthy oils found at the grocery store can help control the amount of fat you use. Choose a healthy corn, safflower or olive oil to spray on foods so you can bake instead of frying or brushing foods with oil.

Step 4: Eat your veggies and fruits! Eat a range of colors: green, red, orange, yellow vegetables and fruits contain essential nutrients and fiber for good health. These foods are high in vitamins C, A, potassium, antioxidants, phytochemicals; and are naturally low in fat and sodium.

Fill at least half your plate with vegetables, and reach for fresh fruit for dessert or snacks.

Step 5: Reduce the sugar. I’ve always had a sweet tooth, but I’ve cut back on sweets to improve my health and manage my weight. Most of us consume much more sugar than we realize. It lurks in juices, jellies, jams, cookies, candies, cakes, pies, regular soda pop, cereals, snack bars, condiments, and many other foods.

Start with obvious sources of sugar and switch to naturally sweet foods like fruits (fresh, canned without syrup, frozen without sugar, or dried – go lightly here as these are concentrated sources of calories). And don’t think switching to raw sugar, honey or agave syrup is better – it’s still simple sugar.

Read labels: look for the number of grams of sugar per serving and choose alternatives that are lower in sugar. One more caution: some studies indicate that even artificially sweetened foods and beverages may still create cravings for sweets.

Step 6: Cut the sodium and increase the potassium. Almost 1 in 3 American adults have high blood pressure, which is a major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, and kidney disease. A high sodium, low potassium diet is linked to high blood pressure. Sodium is abundant in our food supply. Years ago it was used to preserve foods, but today we have a taste for it and think lower-sodium foods are bland. To add some zip to your foods, replace salt and high sodium spice mixes with naturally spicy ingredients such as hot peppers or jalapeno peppers (also high in vitamins and antioxidants), and your favorite salt-free spices.

Remember to read labels and avoid foods and beverages that are high in sodium.

Increasing potassium in your diet can also help lower blood pressure. Bananas, oranges, potatoes with skins, and low sodium V-8 juice are some of my favorite high potassium (low sodium) sources.

Step 7: Switch to whole grains. Focus on whole grains for nutrient dense foods that can lower blood cholesterol and improve regularity. Whole grains are much tastier than refined white breads, cereals, pastas, and rice.

Some of my favorite grains include steel cut oats, kamut and quinoa. I cook my whole grains in a rice cooker, Instant Pot or a crock pot so I don’t have to monitor the cooking which usually takes 45-50 minutes on the stovetop. Many whole grains can be used to make a simple, tasty salad or can be eaten as a hot breakfast cereal with fruit and nuts.

For quick and tasty whole grain hot cereal, I like old fashioned oats cooked on high for 2 minutes in the microwave and it’s ready to eat. Top it with some dried cranberries and walnuts to add sweetness and texture. It’s quick and easy, inexpensive, tastes great, filling – and healthy too!

Step 8: Reduce stress by taking time for yourself. With a busy schedule, it’s essential to take time out each day to relax, renew, and reenergize! Walking is my time to take a break, step away from daily stresses and enjoy some fresh air, music, or time to talk to friends and family. Choose something every day that allows you to take time to yourself: yoga, meditation, a hot bath, or anything that helps you recharge. Allow yourself at least 10-15 minutes a day – Yes, you can!

Step 9: Include some stretching and strength training. Strength training is essential for maintaining muscle mass, strength, and balance as we age. Stretching helps us to avoid injury and reduce pain. Strengthening your core will protect you from back pain and injuries, improve posture and help you look thinner – and who doesn’t want that?

Step 10: Believe you can do it. It takes time to develop new healthy habits. Try one thing that you believe you can be successful with, and move forward from there. The most important key is to believe that you can make changes that become lifelong commitments for your health.

Best wishes for a heart-healthy future!

Why You May Need To See A Cardiologist

Physician Proposal-If your family-mind specialist prescribes you see a cardiologist, do it. Try not to put it off. You’ll think twice about it.

Are or were a smoker-Smoking is a tremendous hazard factor for coronary illness. It brings down the stream of oxygen to the heart and expands circulatory strain, heart rate, and blood thickening and in addition harms the phones coating the supply routes.

Heart Agony-This is essentially guaranteed. You can see a full rundown of coronary illness indications beneath. In the event that you have any questions about regardless of whether you are encountering a side effect, in any case, get looked at.

Starting another activity program-You are beyond 40 a year’s old beginning another activity program. You may as of now be working with a specialist on being more dynamic, however a cardiologist can check your heart wellbeing and suggest practices that would be useful for your heart.

Diabetic-Lamentably diabetes can add to coronary illness. On the off chance that you encounter side effects of heart issues and are diabetic, you should see a cardiologist.

Family History-On the off chance that anybody in your family has or has had heart issues, you ought to know about coronary illness side effects and think about conversing with a cardiologist about them.

High Aggregate Cholesterol-Add up to cholesterol is the entirety of all the cholesterol in your blood. The higher your aggregate cholesterol, the more prominent your hazard for coronary illness (a cholesterol level of 200 mg/dL or higher).

High circulatory strain-You have hypertension or a high systolic number. The systolic number on your pulse perusing is the principal number. (For instance, if your perusing is 120/80 (120 more than 80), your systolic circulatory strain is 120.)

Difficult Pregnancy-The two times a lady is well on the way to create coronary illness is amid pregnancy or post-menopause.

Gum Sickness-Trust it or not, gum illness can happen when the body is aggravated. Patients with swollen gums regularly have coronary illness.

Coronary illness Manifestations

A considerable lot of us know about the indications of heart maladies like heart assault or stroke. There are different indications of coronary illness also, be that as it may, to know about:

• Extreme weight, crushing, torment, or uneasiness in the chest

• Agony or distress that spreads into the shoulders, neck, arms, or jaw

• Chest torment that turns out to be more extraordinary

• Chest torment that isn’t alleviated by rest

• Chest torment joined with the accompanying side effects:

• Sweating, cool, moist skin, as well as whiteness

• Shortness of breath

• Sickness or regurgitating

• Dazedness or swooning

• Unexplained shortcoming or weariness

• Quick or unpredictable heartbeat

• Agony in the jaw, neck, upper back, as well as chest

• Raspiness in light of weight on the vocal strings

• Trouble gulping

• Heart palpitations

• Tension

• Low circulatory strain

On the off chance that you have any of the manifestations recorded above or if your essential care specialist suggests you see a cardiologist, do it! Your heart is the most critical muscle of your body, so deal with it.